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Interview: Jeffrey Smith

A new study has been published showing genetically modified foods “can significantly impact the viability of human cells”. Some estimates show upwards of 85% of corn crops are genetically modified. Corn is used to make corn syrup and other ingredients used in up to 70% of processed foods. Monsanto’s MON810 gmo corn was the subject of this study.

Not long ago, we spoke with Jeffrey Smith from the Institute for Responsible Technology about why consumers should be concerned about genetically modified foods being used in a major portion of our foodstuffs in this country. Click on the audio to hear what he had to say: FNRN with Jeffrey Smith

This corn is modified to be resistant to Roundup (an herbicide which is also a product of  Monsanto) so that an unlimited amount of the herbicide can be sprayed and the crops won’t die. It also contains BT toxin which explodes the stomachs of certain insects that attempt to eat the corn. “For the first time, experiments have now shown that they can have a toxic effect to human cells,” according to recent research led by the University of Caen researchers in France.

This new study indicates that even extremely low doses of Roundup can damage human cells. No studies have yet been done on the combined effect of making plants “Roundup resistant” while adding BT toxin, although scientists already know that BT toxin lowers the toxicity of Roundup. More and more Roundup must be sprayed on the fields to keep weeds at bay if weeds become Roundup resistant.

On Food Nation Radio Network this week, we will call for changes that need to be made right NOW so that Americans can regain confidence in the food supply in this country.

About elizabethd

Elizabeth Dougherty has been cooking and writing about food intensively for more than ten years. She is the fourth generation of chefs and gourmet grocers in her family with her mother, Francesca Esposito and grandmother, Carmella being major influences in her early cooking years. As a teenager, her family sent her to Europe where she became focused on French and Italian cuisine. She survived a year and half of culinary tutelage under a maniacal Swiss-German chef and is a graduate of NYIT, Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor’s degree in Hospitality, Business and Labor Relations. Food Nation Radio has won two news awards for content. Broadcasting LIVE each week, nationwide, on FoodNationRadio.com and stations around the country.